Wednesday, October 19, 2016

Singing Canaries and Beastly Dogs?

When I first found this recipe for "Pollo Con Migas y Limon (Chicken with Bread Bits and Lemon)," from Penelope Casas, a well respected authority of Spanish cuisine, I saw that it was a traditional recipe from the Canary Islands. This immediately grabbed my attention! After all, the original founders of San Antonio, Texas (one of my most beloved cities, for more see Remember the Alamo!) were transported from Spain's Canary Islands in 1731, to join the existing military/mission community and populate the province of Texas. At the time, low prices in the sugar market caused a severe recession to the islands' sugar-based economy. The decline was caused by successful sugar production in Spain's American territories. It sucks when a government ruins their own economy!

Anyway, although people correctly associate the Canary Islands with canary birds (which were originally brownish green when found on the islands and highly prized for their beautiful singing), the Canary Islands were actually named for their infestation of particularly large and vicious dogs, from the Latin word "canis" meaning dog. Dogs are even present on the Canary Islands Coat of Arms!
So, the islands were named after the beastly dogs, and the birds were named after the islands. Got it?

While this recipe calls for a larger bird, specifically chicken, the addition of ham, onions, and a little white wine makes a very fine dish indeed! Fried bread bits (known as migas and traditional in Spanish cuisine) are perfect to soak up the wonderful flavors of the sauce! Chopped parsley and a touch of lemon brightens the flavors and balances this savory dish! Although this isn't the most beautiful entree to grace your table, no one will care when they taste it! It makes a surprisingly wonderful meal that you will be proud to serve family and friends! I like to serve it with oven roasted potatoes tossed with olive oil, salt, pepper, and a generous pinch of paprika! Yum! What to drink? A Spanish wine, of course!


Pollo Con Migas y Limon (Chicken with Bread Bits and Lemon)

Serves 4

Ingredients:

1 cup bread without crusts, torn or cut roughly into 1/2" pieces
2 tablespoons plus 1-2 teaspoons olive oil
1, 3-3 1/2 pound chicken, cut into serving pieces (Chicken thighs also work well.)
Salt
Flour for dusting
1 medium onion, chopped
1/4 cup chopped Spanish mountain cured ham, prosciutto (which is what I used and was able to find already diced), or capicollo (about 2 ounces)
1/4 cup dry white wine
1/4 cup chicken broth, plus more if needed
1/2 lemon, in thin slices
Minced flat-leaf parsley, for garnish

Directions:

Place the bread pieces on a cookie sheet and drizzle with 1-2 teaspoons olive oil and bake at 350 degrees until golden, about 5 minutes. (It took about 10 minutes in my oven.)

Sprinkle the chicken pieces with salt, then dust them with flour. Heat the remaining 2 tablespoons of olive oil in a shallow casserole or large saute pan and brown the chicken on all sides. When the chicken pieces are nicely browned, set aside on a large plate. To the hot casserole or pan, add the onion and ham and saute until the onion has turned translucent. Return the chicken to the pan and pour in the wine and broth and scatter in the lemon slices. 


Bring to a boil, then transfer to a 350 degree oven and cook, uncovered, 45 minutes, adding more broth if necessary. (I added an additional 1/2 cup broth during the cooking time.) When ready to serve, sprinkle with the bread pieces and parsley.

Recipe adapted from iDelicioso! The Regional Cooking of Spain, by Penelope Casas.

8 comments:

  1. Wonder how the dogs got on the islands?

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  2. Good question! Thanks for visiting my site!

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  3. Thanks for posting this. I had lost my copy. I am a Spain fan and have relied on Casas' books for years to guide my travel. She finds things that the "big names" miss!

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  4. My pleasure! Thanks for visiting my site!

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  5. Can I use brown bread for this, or do I have to get white bread?

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    1. I use leftover baquette, but I'm sure whatever bread you use will be great. Let me know how it turns out for you!

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